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5 days ago
Red Lion Canines

"Don't give up on the hard dogs. They will teach you something you never knew you needed."
~Kathy Kawalec

The thing is, we have inherited some things that are ALL WRONG about dogs.

We have been wrongly led to believe that in order for our dogs to be cooperative, they must be trained to be obedient and rewarded for their compliance.

Most of us dog moms have been conditioned to focus on obedience, compliance and ensuring that our dogs fit societal expectations of what a 'good dog' is supposed to be like.

Basically, that means no matter what our dog's personality or individual preferences, and no matter how they feel, all dogs need to be trained to behave like all good dogs are supposed to behave. No matter what.

So we keep trying harder, doing more training, searching for better rewards, doing our best to train our dogs to be more obedient and more like they're 'supposed to' be. And when it doesn't work, we double down and try even harder. This creates a lot of pressure, guilt, worry and feeling like a failure...and it makes some dogs 'hard'.

Years ago, I got some good advice from an old timer about my young dog Luc, who was proving to be a bit of a challenge for me. He told me that if I keep escalating my training efforts like I had been doing, that I would end up making him a 'hard dog'. That what I should do instead was back off the training, and focus on being soft myself, and to be a better listener. That way we would learn to hear each others whispers.

That may be the best advice I have ever gotten...and it worked like a charm! We grew up to become brilliant partners together ... both on and off of the herding field. <3

After 35 years of being an active dog mom and dog sport competitor myself, and after working with thousands of dog parents in person and virtually from all around the planet, here's what I have discovered:

In spite of our differences, dogs and humans are very much alike. We are both intelligent, sentient, socially-adapted mammals who thrive in loving family units where trust in one another helps us all to feel safe, calm and happy.

That means our primary role as dog moms is to grow and nurture safety, trust and confidence in us and in our dogs ... which leads to calm, connected and mindful behavior ... for everyone!

I believe that focusing on our dog's behavior as something to be manipulated is seriously missing out on the main thing.

What if we focused on connection, and accepting our dogs for who they are? What if, instead of jumping to training and transactions, we created space for cooperation to develop, as we lovingly guide them?

That's what living in partnership is, and it feels so good to break free!

I'd LOVE to help you create a new level of cooperation, connection and understanding with your dog and that's what we'll be working on together in my upcoming live workshop!

Signup for my free "Love Trust Grow" workshop that starts May 16th.

www.brilliantpartnersacademy.com/5daysignup1

Hope to see ya there!
Kathy xo
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1 week ago
Red Lion Canines

Timeline photosI NOSE WHAT TIME IT IS !
Dogs just seem to know when it’s time for food, time for a walk or even what time we’re expected to come home, sometimes down to the exact minute!
Yes, they may know this simply from daily routines that create predictable patterns or certain cues that predict certain events, but there is far more to this ability to tell time than the obvious reasons.
One theory is that time has a particular smell. Different times of the day smell differently. Morning smells differently to afternoon or evening. As air heats up over the course of the day, air currents change and move around, carrying molecules of different odours with it. These changes become predictable and a dog’s incredible sense of smell enables these odours to become their “clock”.
One example is when you leave the house to go to work, leaving a strong scent behind you. As time passes, your scent becomes weaker. Dogs predict that when your scent becomes weakened to a certain level, it’s time for you to come home. The level of your scent predicts what time you come home. As dogs can detect both strong and weak scents and all the levels in between, it means that they are actually interpreting events across an interval of time.
Another way dogs may tell time is through circadian rhythms. Just like us, dogs have fluctuations in systems like hormone levels, neural activity or body temperature and these rhythms may help them to understand the approximate time of day - just like when our stomach starts growling when it’s nearly time for dinner or we feel tired when it's time for bed.
Dogs are not the only species that can interpret time. Animals that migrate or hibernate follow seasonal cues from nature in the form of daylight and temperature to know when it’s the right time.
Having hundreds of millions more scent receptors than us, a dog’s amazing ability to smell is a likely reason that dogs just "nose" what time it is.
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1 week ago
Red Lion Canines

If you are looking for a local dog groomer contact Heather at Fur’N’Foam in Blean
Contact number 07921770671 or email furnfoamblean@gmail.com
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2 weeks ago
Red Lion Canines

A very sad situation, but owner unable to give max what he needs.
He will be assessed before rehoming, but am told OK with dogs and children. He is chipped and vaccinated and will be neutered.
Welcome Max. ❤️🐾
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2 weeks ago
Red Lion Canines

Photos from Mika's Mutts Dog Rescue's post ... See MoreSee Less

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3 weeks ago
Red Lion Canines

Photos from Mika's Mutts Dog Rescue's post ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago
Red Lion Canines

😂🤣The struggle is real 💪 ... See MoreSee Less

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3 weeks ago
Red Lion Canines

With the cost of living going up I can see a lot more dogs coming into rescue. I really don't know how rescues are going to be able to cope.
I see rescues on Facebook struggling already to try and find suitable homes for the dogs especially when some need a specific environment.
I try my best to help a dog in need but that's only if we have a suitable Foster.
Last resort is kennels but that costs £7 per dog per day. I really don't know where all this will end. 😩
If anyone fancies fostering please get in touch.
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